Wayang Kulit, Keroncong and Dangdut

An amazing fusion of keroncong and dangdut music accompanies the wayang ‘Cintaku di Negerimu’.

Dalang Ki Gendut Dalang and musicians from Solo (CongWayNdut) perform to a very receptive audience at the Malay Heritage Centre, Singapore.

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OK Karya Pemuda 1

In the 1980s and 1990s Tegalharjo, the area along the railway line between Jebres and Balapan stations in Solo, was well known for its keroncong. OK Kelana Remaja, one of the most popular groups from that era, held regular latihan in the area behind SMA Kristen, Solo. However over time the musicians aged or lost interest and, as there weren’t many young players to replace them, the latihan gradually ceased.

A few years ago some of the ex-members started playing again on Thursday nights at Biro Teknik Listrik Karya Pemuda and before long were joined by young musicians who were keen to learn and play keroncong. They recruited more players, including students from SMK N 8 and formed OK Karya Pemuda.

Enjoy.

Jempol Jenthik Orkes Keroncong

Love the haunting introduction to Lala- Anyam-anyaman nyaman by Jempol Jenthik Orkes Keroncong (JJOK) at 2015 SKF. Lyrics are by  Sujiwo Tejo an Indonesian poet, writer, musician, actor, dalang.
video and audio by Ganang Partho

At the end you can follow the link to a keroncong medley Lir-llir – Ave Maria featuring the wonderful Sruti Respati with JJOK.

 

Komunitas Keroncong Anak Jombang SKF 2015

Young musicians dominated this year’s keroncong festival. Many of the groups were made up of young players who presented their own versions of keroncong. They adapted modern musical sounds and incorporated different instruments to create lively, entertaining keroncong.
Hope you enjoy the talented Komunitas Keroncong Anak Jombang (KKAJ).

Orkes Sekar Kedaton at SKF 2014

Congkil or Keroncong Tingkilan is a fusion of keroncong and Tingkilan, a type of music played in the Kutai province of East Kalimantan.  The Kutai word Tingkilan comes from Ting – the sound of a plucked string -and Kil – the act of plucking the string.

The music has much in common with Malay music and developed with the entry of Islam into the area. The lyrics, in the form of rhyming satire, are usually about love, justice and hope and are accompanied by psaltery (type of stringed zither), harp or mandolin, ketipung, violin and viola. Guitar, bass, drums and tambourines may also be played.

Tingkilan music often accompanies Kutai folk dance such as Dance Jepen.

Click here to enjoy Just the Way You Are by Orkes Sekar Kedaton.